National first for cash saving carriageway lighting

A new experiment to trial LED lights near Hicks Gate roundabout, Keynsham is being conducted by Bath & North East Somerset Council. The trial is thought to be one of the first of its kind in the country and will save local taxpayer’s money, help cut carbon emissions, and improve visibility for drivers and cyclists. 

The Council have installed 71 LED lights that light-up the carriageway much more brightly than traditional lighting. Nearly £4,500 per year in lighting costs will be saved and there will be an estimated 25 ton reduction in carbon emissions because of the environmentally-friendly technology.  

Councillor Roger Symonds (Lib-Dem, Combe Down), Cabinet Member for Transport, said “We understand that this is one of the first instances in the country of this type of technology being used on a major traffic route. The lights will automatically adjust brightness levels according to the time of day and also the number of vehicles on the route at different times of night.

“The end result is that Bath & North East Somerset Council saves money on behalf of local taxpayers, cuts our carbon footprint, and makes the route even safer because the lights illuminate the carriage much more clearly for drivers and cyclists.”

Smaller scale tests of the LED technology have already been conducted by the Council at St. James Rampire, Bath and footpaths in Midsomer Norton using lower wattage lamps.

Kelvin Packer, Service Manager for Highways and Parking for the Council, added, “The lights have a lifespan of around 60,000 hours meaning that maintenance costs and the time that lighting replacement crews spend on the highway are both reduced. Depending on the outcome of this trial, there is the possibility of extending this lighting and associated benefits to other areas of the district.”

A new experiment to trial LED lights near Hicks Gate roundabout, Keynsham is being conducted by Bath & North East Somerset Council. The trial is thought to be one of the first of its kind in the country and will save local taxpayer’s money, help cut carbon emissions, and improve visibility for drivers and cyclists. 

The Council have installed 71 LED lights that light-up the carriageway much more brightly than traditional lighting. Nearly £4,500 per year in lighting costs will be saved and there will be an estimated 25 ton reduction in carbon emissions because of the environmentally-friendly technology.  

Councillor Roger Symonds (Lib-Dem, Combe Down), Cabinet Member for Transport, said “We understand that this is one of the first instances in the country of this type of technology being used on a major traffic route. The lights will automatically adjust brightness levels according to the time of day and also the number of vehicles on the route at different times of night.

“The end result is that Bath & North East Somerset Council saves money on behalf of local taxpayers, cuts our carbon footprint, and makes the route even safer because the lights illuminate the carriage much more clearly for drivers and cyclists.”

Smaller scale tests of the LED technology have already been conducted by the Council at St. James Rampire, Bath and footpaths in Midsomer Norton using lower wattage lamps.

Kelvin Packer, Service Manager for Highways and Parking for the Council, added, “The lights have a lifespan of around 60,000 hours meaning that maintenance costs and the time that lighting replacement crews spend on the highway are both reduced. Depending on the outcome of this trial, there is the possibility of extending this lighting and associated benefits to other areas of the district.”

 

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